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DAESH COMPUTER DATA COULD HELP STOP FOREIGN FIGHTER TRAVEL TO IRAQ, SYRIA – PENTAGON

WASHINGTON- The Daesh's huge computer data, recently captured by the coalition, reveals how the group facilitates foreign fighter travel in and out of Iraq and Syria, the Pentagon said.

This "gives us valuable insight into stopping the flow of foreign fighters into the region," coalition spokesman, US Army Col, Christopher Garver, told reporters.

This information comes from more than 10,000 items, including more than four terabytes of digital information, which were recently seized by Syrian local fighters and the coalition in Syria.

It also reveals how Daesh "organise their governance structures, to ensure they can completely control all aspects of daily life, from religious practice, to education to tax collection and management of central services," he said.

"We also see indoctrination of the young by rewriting text books, with the language of hate, for those not following the prescribed Daesh way of life written into it."

Meanwhile, amid the investigation into allegations that civilians were killed during a coalition raid, announced two days ago by US Defence Secretary, Ash Carter, he said that, reports that civilians were mixed-in amongst Daesh fighters came, after the decision to launch the strikes.

"During that portion of the fight, our SAC (Syrian Arab Coalition) partner force, observed a large group of Daesh fighters in a convoy, who appeared to be readying for a counter attack against SAC troops in the area," he said.

A strike called later, on the group "was against both buildings and vehicles. Afterwards, we received reports from several sources, both internal and external, that there may have been civilians in the area, who are mixed-in and among the Daesh fighters.

"We are reviewing all available evidence to determine if the information we have is credible enough to warrant a formal investigation," he underlined.

Garver went on to stress that coalition forces "apply an extraordinary amount of rigour into our strike clearance procedures, to do everything possible to avoid civilian casualties or unnecessary collateral damage and to comply with the principles of the law of armed conflict." On the ground, he said, "Iraqi security forces recently isolated the town of Aswaja Garbi on the east side of the Tigris, while Daesh still controls towns on the western side of the river - the two largest being Qayyarah and Sharqat in Nineveh Province.

The Iraqi Army have also retaken the Dulab peninsula, on the south side of the Euphrates River, while the area north of the river is still controlled by the group.

In Syria, coalition air strikes, backed Syrian local forces capture a Daesh headquarters in western Manbij and have now seized just under half the city.

While Daesh continues to fight hard within the centre of Manbij, using snipers, improvised explosive devices and "civilians as human shields" he said, they are "collapsing back."

On the coalition's training of Iraqi security forces, he said, approximately 300 border guard police officers completed an inaugural four-week course on tactical defence by trainers from Denmark.

He mentioned that additional courses are being planned for forensic police training to these officers, by Danish trainers.

The newly-trained police officers will be deployed by the Iraqi government along the borders, after the defeat of Daesh.

Source: Name News Network