Thursday, September 19, 2019
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SYRIAN REBELS CLAIM SHOOTING DOWN GOVERNMENT WAR PLANE, BUT SYRIAN MILITARY DENIES

DAMASCUS, Syria- Rebels in Syria, said, they shot down a Syrian government war plane, near a ceasefire zone in southern Syria, but Syrian military denied the claim.

The Jaidh Usud al-Sharqiyeh, or the Army of Eastern Lions, which are active in the Syrian Desert, and the Ahmad al Abdo Forces, claimed in a joint statement that, they downed the aircraft, which crashed in a government-controlled area.

The London-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights (SOHR), a rebel monitor group, also reported that the rebels targeted the war plane, over a desert area, between the southern province of Sweida and Damascus.

There has been no official response from the Syrian government, so far, about the rebels' claims.

But a Syrian military officer denied the reports, of rebels' downing a Syrian war plane in the southern region.

In a phone call, the Sweida-based officer, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said, no war plane was shot down Tuesday, by rebels in Sweida countryside in southern Syria.

The alleged crash site is near a ceasefire zone in southern Syria, agreed upon recently between Russia and the United States.

The ceasefire deal, which went into effect on Sunday, was reached at a meeting between U.S. President, Donald Trump and Russian President, Vladimir Putin, at the G20 summit in Germany.

Under the deal, Russia agrees to ensure the Syrian government and Hezbollah militias adhere to the ceasefire, while the U.S. and Jordan promise to ensure Syrian rebels do the same.

The situation has been relatively quiet in the past two days, in most of the covered provinces, including Daraa, Quneitra and Sweida, though there have been reports of sporadic fighting.

Meanwhile, the seventh round of Syrian peace talks, attended by the Syrian government and opposition officials, started in Geneva on Monday, in an attempt to broker an end to the 6-year-long war in Syria. But the expectation for a breakthrough is low, as the two sides are still far apart over a number of issues.

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK